Can We Enter Multiple If Condition In An If Formula The Decline and Fall of Martial Arts Films and the Rise of the Action Blockbuster Movie

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The Decline and Fall of Martial Arts Films and the Rise of the Action Blockbuster Movie

Compared to 1970s martial arts films 2009/10. with action films of the year

Red Cliff, Ip Man and A true Legend are already iconic of early 21st century “martial arts films” – although many would argue that they are more action games than true “kung fu” films. The 1970s, on the other hand, did not rely on eye candy effects and were characterized more by martial arts actors: Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, The Five Venoms, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Jimmy Wong and other real ones. fighters trained in real kung fu, karate and other arts.

Martial arts become mainstream but evolve into spectacle

Cult classics like Enter the Dragon helped change Hollywood. Its growing popularity forced filmmakers to use martial arts in the “action movie” formula. In the eighties and nineties, spectacle thrillers were expected to have ‘fights’, even if they were just a few basic moves supported by a few stuntmen and wires. Action films became spectacles that required equal parts story, drama, pace, “kung fu”, special effects and improbable plot twists.

In the 21st century, it became less “equal” with films relying first on special effects, then improbable plot twists (surprise is important, right?), followed by pacing, martial arts skills, drama, and last and perhaps least, a contemporary story. . This trend even extended to hot movies of the past few years, including Kung Fu Panda, Forbidden Kingdom, GI Joe and even Transformers.

The Asian film industry is threatening to knock Hollywood out of the spectacle

With the full support and weight of China’s cultural industry, Asian film has become a high-demand mainstream spectacle, led by CGIs such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, House of Flying Daggers and other instant classics. Arguably, Asian film long surpassed Hollywood in terms of imagination, with Western producers buying the rights to several blockbuster Asian films. With the largest population demographic in the world, there can be no doubt that Chinese films will dominate the film industry in the coming years.

Red rock and IP man are perhaps the best known of these new hit classics, but rumor mills and fans alike are abuzz with all the latest “coming soon” rumors. The big fashion movie of 2010 is True Legend (Su Qi Er), starring Zhao Wen-Zho as historical Begger Su, a drunken kung fu originator. Donnie Yen returns in both second episodes IP man saga and long awaited 14 blades. Chow Yun-Fat breaks the mold and surprises everyone with his role as Confucius.

Both Hollywood and Asia rely on CGI and special effects

The growing spectacle and importance of the “business movie” is both enjoyable to the escapist and annoying to the true martial arts fan. Although many films (especially Asian films) feature real martial artists (such as Donnie Yen, Jet Li, and Chow Yun-Fat), the over-reliance on CGI and elaborate choreography makes the adventure look like a cartoon. With notable exceptions like Ip Man and Tony Jaa in Ong Bak (and to a lesser extent Ong Bak 2 and 3), most action movies rely on the “wow” factor – dazzling camera angles and computerized “enhancements”.

Ninja Assassin and Cross-Over

There are definitely crossover movies like Ninja assassin, where actor Rain trained 14 hours a day for months to perfect real martial arts moves (albeit only a handful of repetitive moves), mixed with rather Matrix-esque special effects. For some, the beauty of realistic CGI takes away the pleasure of watching well-choreographed real martial arts.

Ong Bak, on the other hand, under the leadership of Tony Jaaga, a true martial arts expert, managed solid martial arts and good choreography. No stunts, thanks. For this reason, Tony Jaad has been called “the next Bruce Lee” and has created a lot of buzz and excitement in the martial arts community and martial arts movie fans.

There is no escape from escapism

Action movies are escapist entertainment by design. They’ve become somewhat cartoonish (sorry, graphic novel), but that’s what most audiences want. We want to forget reality.

Kill Bill and Kill Bill 2 probably got the closest to the perfect mix of both escapist fan and martial arts enthusiast-fan. Although it was by no means “real” and contained a bright and lively mix of satire, cartoons, spoofs and choreography, it nostalgically yet nostalgically recalled the glory days of Enter the Dragon. Classic Japanese Samarai movies from the 70s.

Japanese film stays true to martial arts traditions?

Perhaps Japan is the film industry most in tune with the older traditions of martial arts filmmaking. Zatoichi, the blind swordsman, was a low-budget film that became an instant cult classic. Zatoichi took film audiences back to the classic true sword skills of the old Samarai films of earlier decades and spawned video games and an entire industry.

Less is more? Where are the real martial arts skills?

There are still plenty of real martial arts actors, led by superstars like Donnie Yen and Jet Li – and most Chinese martial arts actors are proficient. In Hollywood, filmmakers opt for four-move choreography (two punches, a block, and a kick), multiple camera angles (especially close-ups when the martial artist’s skills aren’t genuine), pounding music, FX, and stunts. . With the old hopes gone from the Hollywood big screen – Chuck Norris, Jean Claude Van Damme and other promising true martial artists – the world is now different for Asian film actors – working fourteen hours a day in the cold, often in primitive environments. conditions, pulling off really complex martial arts moves for relatively paltry salaries – and Hollywood movies that now depend on the computer and the actor.

Batman is now doing kung fu

Batman now practices kung fu and does it too GI Joeand even Hell boy. They’re fun, but the martial arts fan will miss the great lights of martial arts movies who built their careers on the “real thing”: Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, David Chiang, Sonny Chiba, Chen Kuan-tai, Tomisaburo Wkayama, Jimmy Wong Yu, Ti Lung and the Liu brothers.

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