What Is The Formula For The Diameter Of A Circle How to Choose Binoculars for Birding: The Right Binoculars Can Make a Difference!

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How to Choose Binoculars for Birding: The Right Binoculars Can Make a Difference!

Choosing the right pair of binoculars for birding or birding can really make the difference between starting a great and enjoyable hobby and becoming a frustrated birder. It’s just so important. Some activities depend so much on your first experience that it’s a shame you probably won’t do them again. Bird watching is one of those activities. If you can’t find a bird, or if you can’t focus clearly enough on either ID or see the details in its colors, it can be very frustrating. When you hear people talking about how beautiful a bird is and you struggle to even see the bird, it can drive you crazy! I want to tell you what to look for when getting binoculars that will make your new hobby that much more enjoyable!

Compromise is a word we often use when choosing binoculars for birding. The trick is to try to understand what you want from the optic and how you are likely to use the optic. For example, binoculars are better if they have very large lenses, they let in more light and allow you to see much better in low light, they are also heavy and can be tiring if you have to carry them around all day. A smaller lens may not let in as much light, but it’s much easier to carry around. You have to decide what is best for you!

What do all the numbers mean?

The first thing you notice when you look at the binoculars is a lot of numbers! That’s what some of these numbers mean! You’ll see things like 8 x 32, 10 x 42, 5 x 25, and everything in between. The first number is the magnification, the second number is the diameter of the lens (in front of the large lens), usually in millimeters. You may see FOV and the number is usually in feet. such as 200, 315, 180. this is the diameter when the sight is usually 1000 yards away. More on them later.

Size: Choosing the size of binoculars depends on several factors. Planning to hike or watch from your front porch or car? Are your hands steady or shaky or do you shake slightly? They all play a part in making this decision. You want to find a balance between weight, lens size, and how you intend to use them. Although compact binoculars are small and easy to carry, they aren’t as sharp, don’t work as well in low light, and can be harder to hold in place. Larger lenses tend to have large lenses and sharp, clear images even in low light, but they can be heavy. There are mid-size models with lenses in the 30-35mm range and full-size models with lenses in the 40-45mm range. Full size gives you almost all the detail you can process with your eye, but it’s a bit more weighty. You must have an idea of ​​your usage.

Roof vs. Porro Prisma: This determines the configuration of the binoculars more than anything else. Porro prism is used in classic binocular form, Katuseprisma is straight, more like a telescope. The optical advantage of either is small, but the manufacturing costs are more in the roof prism. So they are usually more expensive and a bit more compact. These prisms are made of two main materials, BK-4 and BAK-7. BK-4 is considered better because BAK-7 can blur the edges of the image.

Lens lens sizes: As we touched on earlier, this is the lens on the front of the binoculars, whose main function can be considered to be gathering light. the larger the diameter of the lens, the more light you can collect. For example, a 35mm lens collects about 2 times more light than a 20mm lens. It is based on the formula area=pi(r)². But a larger lens weighs more and is less convenient to carry around. Most birders recommend the largest size of 42mm for long-term carrying comfort.

Coatings: Coatings are applied to glass lenses in a number of ways, but they are designed to transmit light, reduce reflections, and improve color accuracy. The best binoculars are fully coated, meaning that all the lens elements inside the binoculars are coated. Only some lens elements are coated and uncoated. This treatment can significantly increase the transmission of collected light. The coating on the lenses is very thin and a bit delicate, when cleaning the lenses you have to be careful not to damage the coating.

FOV: It measures the width of the lenses’ angle of view. think of it this way, when you look at an object through binoculars, the circle you see is your field of view. they measure it either in corners or in ft/1000yds. If you see a value like 315 feet/1000 feet, it means that if you are focused on an object that is 1000 yards away, you will see a circle with a diameter of 315 feet. If you are given a value in degrees, such as 6.5 degrees, you can convert to feet by multiplying the degrees by 52.5. The wider the field of view, the easier it is to find and track birds as birds tend to move quickly, so finding them quickly is essential to a good field trip. Desired for bird watching and angle 6.5 or 341 feet at 1000 feet.

Eye relief: this is how far the image is projected from the eyepiece towards your eye. This can be a problem for people who wear glasses like me. If you wear glasses, you’ll want to look for long relief or adjustable eyelids that can be pulled in for your glasses.

These are big things to consider when buying a new pair of birdwatching binoculars. This is by no means an exhaustive list of things to consider, but it has hit the big ideas. Understanding these terms and how they work can make choosing your first pair of birding binoculars easier. It’s even more frustrating when you find all the information about a certain product. Use all the resources to find out before spending any money!

Happy birding!

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